Articles Posted in Medicaid Planning

In Florida, the primary residence is often protected by the Florida constitutional homestead protections.

While in many other states, a persons homestead is not protected from creditors and can be lost to claims for Medicaid reimbursement, this is not the case in Florida. The only creditors that can make a claim against the home are those that do something with the home. These may include a roofer or the bank which financed the home.

If you or a spouse needs nursing home case, selling the home can place that asset or the money received from the sale at risk to creditors as well as Medicaid eligibility. There are several methods of avoiding probate on your homestead. Choosing the right method is not an easy decision without knowing your facts and circumstances.

Probate is the system the court uses to administer a person’s estate, either through a will or through intestate succession. Clients often ask for ways to avoid the probate process, such as adding a child to their bank account or adding the child’s name to the deed.

Adding a Child to a Bank Account

In most cases, adding a child to your bank account is not a good idea. A parent who adds a child to his or her bank account, may interfere with the will, and could put the account’s funds at risk.

Over the last year I worked with an intern in our office of a Law Review article for Texas Tech University. This article describes problems with current estate planning and takes the premise that most estate planners have become lazy because of advancements in technology. That is, most only ask their clients about issues that their software is capable of addressing. We identify 6 primary areas that are not addressed in most estate plans:

  1. Firearms;
  2. Digital Assets;
  3. Asset Protection;
  4. Life Planning;
  5. Controlling from the Grave; and
  6. Pets

The citation for the article is
David Goldman & Charles Jamison, The Future of Estate Planning: The Multigenerational Life Plan, 5 Est. Plan. & Community Prop. L. J. 1 (2012).
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greenhouse.pngYou can transfer ownership of your real estate property through probate, or by signing an instrument known as a deed.1 Using a deed to transfer ownership of your real estate allows you to bypass probate, but there are some risks associated with this alternative. This blog discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using a deed to transfer ownership of your real estate property.

Advantages of Using a Deed to Transfer Ownership

  1. A transfer by deed can allow you to reserve the right to use the real estate property transferred for the remainder of your lifetime: There are different types of deeds that can be used to transfer property and each one of them serve a different purpose. Some deeds, like the life estate deed, allow you to transfer ownership of your real estate property while reserving you the right to use the property for the remainder of your lifetime.

rings.jpgCouples who are still married, even into their 70s or 80s are the lucky ones. They’ve made it through the hard times, the ups and downs of life, ]and still have their companion at their side. But even the most devoted of spouses is sometimes finds it necessary to exercise “Spousal Refusal” to pay the long-term care bills of their spouse when he or she has lost the ability to perform the activities of daily living.

Spousal Refusal refers to one spouse’s official and legal refusal to pay for long-term care expenses of the other spouse. In general, married couples have a legal obligation to pay for the healthcare costs incurred by either spouse if they are admitted into a nursing home. However, if your spouse has been admitted to a nursing home, and you have limited resources, you may fill out a form with Medicaid stating that you refuse to pay for your spouse’s care. This may sound cruel or selfish, but exercising Spousal Refusal can sometimes be the only way to save the healthy spouse’s small nest egg for his or her own needs in later years.

Spousal Refusal is not about turning away from a spouse in their time of need; in fact, many of the elderly individuals who exercise this option do so only after a long and painful decision-making process, and they do it not out of selfishness but out of necessity. Patients who need more than the first 100 days of nursing or rehab care covered by Medicaid can find themselves facing costs in excess of $100,000 per year. It is not uncommon for a couple to lose their house and all of their savings because of one extended stay in a nursing home.

happy_elderly_couple_americare.jpgAlzheimer’s is a disease that affects everybody it touches–husbands, wives, children and grandchildren–they all bear witness to their loved one’s slow demise.

Sadly, emotional stress is not the only stress that accompanies Alzheimer’s disease; those loved ones serving as caretakers may carry a huge amount of financial stress as well. The cost of caring for an Alzheimer’s patient can run anywhere from $64 a day to $77,380 a year, and because Alzheimer’s disease can be such a long-lasting disease (a person can suffer from Alzheimer’s for up to 20 years) the costs of care can end up being astronomical. It’s obvious that people can’t do it alone.

Long-term care insurance can be very helpful in paying for the costs of care necessary for a loved one suffering from Alzheimer’s… if your loved one has thought ahead and purchased the policy before they or their spouse began suffering from symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Some people may not have thought ahead and hope that government programs will be able to help with the high cost of care. Medicaid (or MediCal in California) can be helpful–although Medicare doesn’t cover the cost of long-term care–but only if you fall in the right category and know how to navigate the complex Medicaid system.

Many of our clients and readers in Florida are caregivers of elderly parents; they have chosen to take responsibility for their parents–whether it be physical responsibility, financial, or other. But what if instead of making that choice, you had responsibility for your aging parents thrust upon you? This is exactly what happened in the case of Health Care & Retirement Corporation of America v. Pittas, recently brought before the Pennsylvania appeals court.

This particular case states that “On or about September 24, 2007, after completing rehabilitation for injuries sustained in a car accident, Appellant’s [John Pitta’s] mother was transferred to a HCR facility for skilled nursing care and treatment. Appellant’s mother resided in the facility and was treated by HCR until March of 2008. In March of 2008 Appellant’s mother withdrew from the HCR facility and relocated to Greece.”

Following Pittas’ mother’s relocation, a large portion of her bill at the nursing home went unpaid. Mr. Pittas’ mother applied to Medicaid to cover her care, but while that application was still pending, the nursing home sought to hold Mr. Pittas responsible for the debt under the state’s filial responsibility law. Although the case went to an arbitration panel which initially ruled in favor of Mr. Pittas, eventually the Pennsylvania trial court ruled in favor of the nursing home, holding Pittas responsible for nearly $93,000 of his mother’s nursing expenses.

Unpdaid long-term care bills are increasing and becoming more of a problem in many states. All 50 States have statutes that obligate adults to care for children or other family members; if your parent lives in one of 29 states, you could be held responsible for your parents unpaid long-term care bills. What? How could this be? are the typical reactions to many living in these unfortunate states.

Katherine Pearson at Penn State Law School has written a paper on Fillal Support Laws and the enforcement Practices for laws requiring adult children to pay for indigent parents.

Her abstract states:

happy_elderly_couple_americare.jpgJacksonville Elder Law Lawyers keep up with legal matters as well as non-legal matters when it comes to advocating and educating the elderly. A recent article published in the Times of India discusses a study conducted by scientists at the University of South Florida and the University of Shanghai.

The findings of an 8 month controlled trial, compared a group of Chinese seniors who practiced Tai Chi (a Chinese form of self-defense that has evolved into a graceful exercise) 3 times a week to a group with no intervention. The results of the study found increases in brain volume and improvements on tests of memory and thinking in those seniors who practiced Tai Chi three times a week. The same trial also showed increases in brain volume and more limited cognitive improvements in a group that participated in lively discussions 3 times per week over the same period.

This was the first trial to show that a less aerobic form of exercise, Tai Chi, as well as stimulating conversation, led to increases in brain volume and improvements on psychological tests of memory and thinking.

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